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Attempts to avoid truck driver fatigue can be dangerous

Wed 2 Jan, 2019 / by / Personal Injury

Truck driver fatigue poses a major danger to people on the roads in Illinois. In one poll, around 25 percent of truck drivers admitted to falling asleep behind the wheel at least once in the past month. Trucking accidents are particularly dangerous to passengers and drivers in smaller vehicles as well as pedestrians and cyclists. In 2016, 3,986 people were killed as a result of truck crashes, but only 17 percent of the lives lost were those inside the truck.

Many thousands more are injured in trucking accidents, often severely. Trucks are on the roads at all hours of the day and night, and drivers often face severe pressure to meet deadlines for their deliveries. As a result, everyone on the road may be at risk. The danger is particularly great from long-haul truck drivers who may be on the road for hours on end with little rest. Around 65 percent of all truck collisions involve trips that stretch for at least 51 miles, according to statistics.

As a result, there are a number of initiatives to improve roadway safety by attempting to reduce the risks posed by truck driver fatigue. However, many drivers may take the matter into their own hands and reach for an even more dangerous solution: stimulants. According to random drug tests, nearly 0.6 percent of truck drivers make use of methamphetamine, cocaine or other stimulants in order to stay awake behind the wheel.

The victims of truck crashes may suffer catastrophic injuries as a result of a truck driver’s negligent driving. A personal injury lawyer can help people injured in a crash to pursue compensation for their damages, including medical bills and lost wages.